Casey Reynolds

11 Power-Packed Interview Questions Designed To Trip Them Up Every time



The Secret To Uncovering Deception
Interview questions for employers

Interviewing is an art. There’s a certain way to structure your interview questions for employers that will get your candidate to open up and tell you the truth about themselves. Searching for irregularities in their responses is one way to do this.

3 Keys To Finding Inconsistencies
How to uncover discrepancies when asking interview questions for employers

Keep asking the same question, but in different ways to throw them off. Ask the same questions on the phone interview as you do on the face-to-face interview, making sure to write their responses down so you don’t forget them. Then go one step further and ask the same question again on the job application. This process will uncover skeletons they may be trying to hide from you.

Because the phone qualification interview is normally a day or more prior to the face-to-face interview, it’s virtually impossible for your candidate to remember every single answer they gave you. After the interview, compare their responses from the phone qualification interview to the face-to-face interview. Then compare these both to the responses on the job application. Any inconsistencies should raise a red flag to you.

Tell The Truth
Conflicting stories may be revealed when asking interview questions for employers

Since the candidate physically writes down their answers on the job application, this is a great place for you to place a blurb asking them if all statements are true and accurate.

When they have to write their answer down and sign their name to it, you may get a different story. Make sure to write a sentence right before the signature line saying something like this; “Everything on this job application is true and accurate.”

Keep The Cat In The Bag
Reveal as little as possible when asking interview questions for employers

On the phone qualification interview, tell your candidate just enough about the position to get them to come to the interview. If you say too much about the job, they may tailor their responses to what your looking for.

11 Interview Questions Designed To Trip Them UP
Ask these 11 interview questions for employers:

Take a moment and tell me what your ideal job would be besides winning the lottery or laying on the beach?

Their response to this question will tell you their deep down heart’s desire -what they really want to do with their life. If you’re interviewing for a managerial position and their response to this question is “to go back to school to get a law degree,” red flag!

What are the 3 things you enjoy doing most in your current job or former job if you’re currently unemployed?

This response will tell you whether they’re task-oriented or people-oriented. If they say they love working with people and you’re hiring an accountant, red flag!

What’s the # 1 task you disliked doing the most in your last job?

If they say “answering the phone” and you’re hiring a receptionist, red flag!

If you had an option, would you rather work with people in person or over the phone?

If you own a telemarketing company and they respond that they like working with people face-to-face, red flag!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years from now? What do you want to be doing with your life?

If they say “own my own company,” you could be training your next competitor. red flag!

What types of interviews have you been on in the last month?

If they’ve been on a number of customer service interviews and you’re looking for a sales rep, red flag!

What degree do you have?

If they have a business degree and you’re looking for a medical assistant, red flag!

How long have you been selling at XYZ Company?

If they have no sales experience and you’re looking for a sales rep, red flag!

If you had an employee with a bad attitude, how would you handle this situation?

This is considered a situational question, what they would do in a particular situation. If you’re hiring a manager and their response is that they would yell at that employee, red flag!

If I were an employee who constantly came into work late, role play with me what you’d do and say to me.

This is considered a role play scenario. If they respond that they would write them up without talking to them, red flag!

In your life and work, what are you most proud of?

This is considered a priority question. Their response will tell you what is most important to them, family or work. For example, if they respond that their children are their biggest accomplishment, then their priority is family. If they respond that selling the largest account in the history of their company was their biggest accomplishment, then their priority is work.

Asking the right interview questions for employers is the key to getting your candidate to open up and tell you the truth.

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Casey Reynolds is an Entrepreneur, Author and Expert with over 20 years of experience in Hiring and Retaining Employees.Visit him at www.profitableemployeesolutions.com or e-mail him at casey@profitableemployeesolutions.com